DFP


FB

Make Them Laugh, Gomer

If you've been reading this blog for any time now, you will have noticed that I tell far more stories about Adolpha than I do Gomer.  It's not because Adolpha is my favorite.  (She's not.  I don't have favorites.  Really I don't.  My favorite is whoever leaves me alone while I write this.)  It's not even because Adolpha is funnier than Gomer.

It's because over time Gomer has asked me not to write about him.  He will do something hysterical or tell me a funny story and immediately he stops, gets an intense expression, and asks me, "Will this be on the blog, Mom?"


When he was younger, Gomer would tell us some outlandish and amazing stories.  He had fantastic jokes that he would make up and a belly laugh like none I've ever heard.

Over the last year, this has all changed.  Gomer still tells great stories, but he's far more reserved now. This summer I asked him to write in his journal every day so that he could keep his skills sharp for when school started back up.  Last summer this wasn't a problem at all.  Gomer would write about his day or his dreams or his Legos or just about anything.  This summer he complained that he had nothing to write about.  I understood completely.  There are days I have nothing to write about or nothing "moves" me enough to form an opinion on.  I explained to him that we have to write every day or else we'll never find anything to write about.  He asked me what I like to write about.  I told him I love to tell funny stories, but unfortunately I don't have enough for every day.

He was horrified that I liked to tell funny stories.  "What if people laugh at you?" he asked.

"That's the point, Gomer.  I want them to laugh.  I love to make people laugh," I replied.

"No.  What if they laugh at you," he said emphasizing the "at."

He went on to tell me how kids at school started teasing him because he told "weird" stories and he was sure they were all laughing at him and not with him.  He decided to stop telling funny stories, because he didn't like kids laughing at him.

This broke my heart.

One year ago my son was a bubbly kid who cracked us up on a daily basis.  He told knock knock jokes until we were blue in the face and made up hilarious stories.  Now he's worried about what everyone will think of him.  He's afraid to let loose and be himself.  He's wound up so tightly and he's so self-aware of everything he does.  He doesn't even belly laugh much anymore, because that's embarrassing to him.

I think seven years old is just too young to already start doubting yourself.  I was hoping we could put this off at least until the middle school years.  I can't believe that in second grade he's already concerned about appearances.  It upsets me so much that at seven years old there is already this sort of crap to deal with and worry about.  He shouldn't even feel the pressure of fitting in or being like everyone else.  It also upset me to know that he's reining in his creative side, because it's not acceptable to his friends.

I let him see some of the comments on my blog from people who said they laughed until they cried or spit coffee out of their noses ("See, Gomer, they're not embarrassed to say that at all.  I think that's the highest compliment I can get!") or they read my blog when they're having a bad day and it makes it a little brighter or they read my blog while they're undergoing chemotherapy treatment and it lifts their spirits.  I tried to help Gomer understand the power of humor and the amazing gift that it is.

"You can't keep it to yourself," I told him.  "It has to be shared."

Tonight Gomer brought me his homework assignment to check.  He was supposed to write a Halloween story.  I saw glimpses of the old Gomer in this story.  He wrote about a guy who stumbles upon a real haunted house and has a run in with a vampire.  I read it out loud and he stopped me several times to say, "No, Mom, you need more inflection at this part.  He's saying 'PHEW!  That was close!'" or "I thought it would be funnier if he got so scared he jumped out the window."

Like any writer, he took my gentle corrections a bit hard.  He'd messed up his there, their and they're and I was trying to help him see the difference.  It resulted in tears, but I explained to him that all writing goes through several drafts and as hard as it is, we have to take some critiques.

When we finished up for the night, I reminded him that not everyone might think his story is funny (it happens), but I was just so glad to see him taking a chance with his writing and really letting his own style shine through again.  I really hope this continues.



61 comments:

  1. Anonymous09:15

    Poor guy :-( My daughter is 6, soon to be 7, and I see this with her already too. More with sports and stuff than creativity. My older one never really went through this, she's in 5th grade, because she doesn't care that much and lets things roll off. My little one is like me, ultra-sensitive and has a hard time letting things roll off. I just hope that she can learn to let things go (though I still haven't totally--LOL) and just be herself. I'm so glad Gomer is taking a chance with the story!

    ReplyDelete
  2. kisses and hugs for gomer! i know someday my son will get to this point too - when he won't be my funny baby and he'll worry what other people think. your gomer reminds me of my sister, who is 10 years younger than me. when she was in kindergarten, she was chubby and the skinny little girls told her that her clothes were "junky." i'm sure she remembers this as vividly as i do. at least gomer has you to show him positives and negatives and help him find out what's most comfortable for him, over time. great mom post, jen!

    ReplyDelete
  3. You handled that situation beautifully. I come to the sad realization every day the my son has no chance at the carefree childhood that I had because the world is such a different place. He is only 3 but goes to pre-k and daycare and is already dealing with kid issues. I can only try every day to remind him how special he is and his he should always be true to himself.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agreed with every point you make!

      Delete
  4. Anonymous09:31

    Go Gomer!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Anonymous09:32

    Hope to read one of Gomer's stories here soon! It sounds like he's well on his way to being as fantastic a writer as his Mama! Keep writing Gomer!!

    ReplyDelete
  6. My daughter is 7 and it breaks my heart, too, to see her so worried about what other people think. Right after school started we went shopping at Michael's and she found armwarmers that she loved. We took them home and decorated them and she couldn't wait. When we went to go to school the next day, she decided at the last minute she didn't want to wear them and finally said it was because she didn't want anyone "paying attention to her." I actually broke down and started crying in the car! We sat outside her school for 15 minutes (with her worrying that she was late and me saying I didn't care) talking about not worrying about what others think of her style choices as long as she's happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a daughter who's quite self conscious at times too. You made me cry just thinking about you sitting in the car crying.
      Here's to kids who are free to be themselves!!

      Delete
  7. Anonymous09:32

    Jen, this breaks my heart a little. I am so glad he told you what was going on and you were able to help him. My 4 year old sounds like Gomer (pre kids making him feel bad) and I hope that spirit never dies in him. Parents are supposed to be fostering our kids creativity, not shooting it down and it makes me wonder about these kids at Gomers school and what their parents have said to them. I am really glad that Gomer has you as his mom. Hope he gets an A+ on his paper!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Too many parents don't pay attention to their kids (or parent them) at all. I believe this leads to a lot of the bullying and putting other kids down that seems so prevalent today. Too many kids out there have to make others feel bad so they can feel better, which is just PATHETIC.

      Delete
  8. Good job Momma! And good for you Gomer! My kids are younger (1 and 3) but you've reminded me of the kind of parent I strive to be :)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Anonymous09:41

    This made me cry:( I hate that kids lose their carefree attitude so quickly. I try to tell my kids not to worry what others think, but I also don't want them to have to worry about being made fun of. I can see why a young kid would want to fly under the radar, kids are brutal! I also think that school in general strips kids of their creativity, but that is for another post. I hope Gomer can keep his spirit. Maybe you could show him a Bill Cosby stand up act. Having the ability to make people laugh is on of the greatest gifts one could have.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I wish he would let you post one of his stories here. I'm sure we'd love it.

    ReplyDelete
  11. My son, at 28. is still the most creative writer I know. His stories are fantastic. He does role-playing games and can make up the best back stories for his characters. I love his creativity. When he was too young to write, he made up stories to go along with the pictures he drew and I wrote them down and later attached them to the back of the pictures. They are all stored away still.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Am I the only one who sees the irony of this story. A person who berates others (in the name of satire of course) is upset that her son is on the receiving end of it. I get the blog - it's funny and I enjoy reading it. It does sadden me that this is happening to a 7 year old - I have a 5 year old daughter and if she was in the same boat I'd be angry. But come on - Jen does this same kind of "teasing" on an almost daily basis. It sucks now that the shoe is on the other foot. I hope that Gomer finds the courage to be himself, and that he is not teased for doing so. No kid should have to endure that, at least not any more than a bridezilla, a crazy party mom, a douchey dad, or an elf on the shelf OAM.

    I probably don't have to point out the satire in my comment as most people on here recognize it, but in case I do there it is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I understand what you're saying, but Jen is an adult. She writes about adults. Kids shouldn't have to endure this so early.

      Delete
    2. So what is the magical age that we are allowed to start making others feel bad about themselves?

      Delete
    3. What Jen does is make assholes look like assholes (true colors and all that jazz). If it were Gomer making those other kids see how they were acting/making others feel then it would be the same deal. In his case it's just assholes making him feel bad about himself. Not at all the same.

      Delete
    4. wait14:55

      By what standard are we basing these judgements on? Who's moral authority is superior here? Making "fun" of people is always subjective. What Jen sees as calling out an asshole might actually be hurtful to the "asshole" as the "asshole" is living his/her life based on their own standards. I apologize if my thoughts don't come out clearly. I am not a gifted writer as jen and gomer are. Or are they? Again, this judgement is based upon MY own standard. It might not stand up to yours. :)

      Delete
    5. Lewis,
      You just proved Jen's point to her son. She writes about the things she enjoys, things that make her tick, using her talents in ways that make her life feel full. Despite that, she will never make everyone feel good and love her writing. She isn't afraid to be who she is, knowing that not everyone will like it. That is her point to her son. He should be who he is and not worry so much about what others think, because in the end he won't be able to please everyone, so he should at least be content with himself, by being himself. Even if Jen wrote about puppies and kittens, and every thing happy, it wouldn't please everyone. Someone is bound to be allergic to kittens or find them annoying and therefore wouldn't want to read her blog. At the end of the day she is who she is, and she is ok if you don't like her.

      Delete
    6. Beautifully said, Chad and Lisa! 2 thumbs up!

      Delete
  13. It is really sad that at such a young age kids aren't wanting to be kids anymore. My 10 year old is going through this at school. She is so quiet and shy at school, but at home, she is very outgoing and loud. I don't want her to miss out on things that I missed out on during high school because I was too scared and embarrassed. I enjoy your hilarious post, but this touched my heart and really showed your sweet motherly side. Thanks Jen, keep up the good work!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous10:09

    Hopefully one day he will have the confidence to let you post one of his stories here. I used to write like that all the time growing up, and that gift was nurtured by my grandma. Unfortunately, my gift has been lost to being an adult. Poor Gomer, he is lucky to have a mama bear like you and hopefully he will keep at it like I couldn't.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Goner, I really enjoy hearing about some of the funny things you say to your family. I often laugh, but I'm never laughing at you, Im laughing cause I want you to know I think you're funny! Please keep being funny, and remember this: even if someone DOES laugh at you, its probably because they are just wishing they were as funny or clever as you. So keep em laughing kiddo!

    ReplyDelete
  16. This brought tears to my eyes. My five-year-old daughter has already had a few incidents where some other kid said she was ugly or didn't want to play with her or etc., etc., etc. I want so badly for her to feel like she can be herself and just tell the mean girls to go to hell.

    I'm glad Gomer is writing again. I hope you can nurture that skill in him and help him see that he has a gift that not everyone is lucky enough to possess.

    ReplyDelete
  17. You SERIOUSLY must let him know that *I* think he is awesome! SEVEN and writing stories out of pure imagination! I know you probably tell him often, but he is gifted if he can do this! I have an *almost* 8 year old daughter who couldn't find imagination if it knocked on her brain. Not being mean, just realist, she's musical and mathematical, but imaginative is not her.

    When you were describing his feelings, I thought you were describing a FIFTEEN year old! Not a 7 year old!

    And I have the loudest belly laugh as well! I was teased by my sister (even my mother!) but I get praised for having such an infectious laugh now. Being little is hard, being big is hard, liking and being proud of who you are is hardest, but it's also how you are the happiest :)

    ReplyDelete
  18. lynn10:52

    go Gomer!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I second that. Go Gomer--you rock!

      Delete
  19. Anonymous10:59

    Gomer, you rock!!! Just be yourself, don't change for anyone (oh god, a yearbook quote, yuck).

    Who cares that they don't like your stories? As long as you are happy with yourself, that's what matters most. You will find friends that "get you". They are the ones that you keep. The other ones? They aren't as mature as you.

    ReplyDelete
  20. That's so sad. :( My daughter is only 2, but I've been told by moms of 3rd and 4th graders that all the BS that for us started in middle school, now starts around 3rd grade. The mean girls, the clothing concerns, etc. Sounds like Gomer's class is consistent with the trend. I have no idea why it's happening so early now, but it's really sad.

    ReplyDelete
  21. Dear Gomer, if you are reading this, please keep writing. Funny stories, weird stories, what ever that comes to your mind - write it down. And try and welcome every opportunity to share it. I know, it's scary - but you will be so glad you took that chance. I won't lie to ya - there may be kids/people/teachers who may not get how great your story is, but there will be hundreds more people who will think it's awesome. You will have made their day better. You will have tickled their brains and given them the gift of thought. And please count me in, as one of those people who will get a kick out of your stories - and will see what a courageous person you are for writing it. And hey, some of us are not looking to read 'perfect stories'. We're looking for signs that there are smart, witty, sweet kiddos out there with active minds. Your story doesn't have to be 'perfect'. We just wanna hear A story, told by a creative, thoughtful boy like you. That makes us happy :) So please keep writing. And keep sharing it with your mom. I know, you might roll your eyes when I say 'I'm a mom too and my heart was pounding, tears filling up my eyes when I read this' - but it's true. But not in a sad way - I'm so glad your mom shared this with us today. When my girls come home from school today, I'm gonna take extra time to sit down with them when they write in their daily journal :) So thanks Gomer, and thanks Gomer's Mom! Have a great day!

    ReplyDelete
  22. I was saddened when I read this because it is never fun to see your child have to defend who they are in order to fit someone else's notions about who they should be. I will take a page from your book when dealing with the next similar situation I face with my nine year old. We have been working through this type of stuff for about 3 years now, and the best thing I can do for her is to remind her that it doesn't change when you leave school, the real world is very similar and she will just have to make good decisions about how much someone else's opinion matters to her. We use the 5 year test...if it won't matter to her in 5 years it probably isn't important now...I use this technique as well.

    ReplyDelete
  23. When I read this, and think about my own kids stifling themselves as well, I it just beyond depressing. Could we start a revival of 'Free to Be You and Me'?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahh, you speak my language! I grew up on 'Free to Be You and Me'- and now, eleven, twelve, thirteen years later (as a sophomore in high school) my friends and I will still sometimes quote parts of it to each other. Examples? "I am a SWEET, TENDER, YOUNG THING. So I want the whole mango". Or, perhaps, "Hey. I'm a baby." "I'm a baby too!". My grandad would read that book to me every time I visited their (my grandparents') house, and he'd make all of these ridiculous, hilarious, hyperbolic voices to go with each character. What a beautiful book.

      Delete
  24. Gomer - hear me - being creative and interesting makes you awesome, and while you may not see it now, people will ultimately like you more. The kids who tease you now will be boring later, and no one will want to go to their parties. I promise.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Jenn12:08

    I would concentrate less on making corrections about his spelling mistakes and concentrate more on him getting back to his regular self. I know that has to be tough for a writer but it's going to be a lot tougher when he just doesn't want to write because he's being critiqued. He's 7, let him make mistakes, it's ok.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Gomer keep writing and keep belly laughing. Life is too short not to laugh a ton and be as creative as you can. If you are worried what other kids will say, write it down and share it with the people you know won't be bashers. It's okay to be a secret writer and your friends don't know, that's why some people write under different names.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Gomer and Adolpha are lucky to have a loving, strong, smart, and sensible mom like you, Jen.

    ReplyDelete
  28. That story just broke my heart. It took me the better part of 30 years to come to terms with the nerd that's inside of me, and to realize that I really don’t give a damn what people have to say or think about me. Gomer is lucky to have you as a Mom. I hope that, with your help, he can find the confidence to be the fun loving boy he once was.

    ReplyDelete
  29. This breaks my heart and makes me happy at the same time. Go Gomer! Do your thing and make people smile! And.... Go Jen! Your children are so lucky to have you, pushing them to be as good as they can be!

    ReplyDelete
  30. Go Gomer! Never ever hide your gift of making people laugh. Sometimes, life can be hard and there are plenty of sad things in this world. We all need people like you and your mom who have the ability to tell an amazing story and brighten up our day.

    ReplyDelete
  31. You have got a gifted little writer on your hands! And you are giving him the best gift of all--setting a great example of what writing and putting yourself out there to people is all about!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I hope that he finds his way back to not caring what others think when it comes to being funny. The men I fall in love with are the ones who can make me laugh until I cry. I am often wound tightly and the greatest release in life is laughter! Your blog has me in tears sometimes and I'm always sharing it with others!

    ReplyDelete
  33. Gomer--Don't give up! I had a Journalism teacher my Junior Year of HS accuse me of having my mother write a "letter to the editor" project. She didn't accuse me until the third draft, which was part of the proof that she was a nut job.

    Best advice I ever heard was to write for yourself and what makes you happy. That's what EL James told Katie Couric she did when she wrote that awful 50 Shades series....HAHAHAHAHA!

    ReplyDelete
  34. Shawna20:04

    Laughter is one of the best gifts you can give someone, Gomer. Never be embarrassed, and never apologize for your talent. As for the they're, their and there difficulty.. pfft.. you'll get those down pat soon enough. :D

    ReplyDelete
  35. Impnjmom20:09

    First off, Gomer, Cat is exactly right...girls love guys who can make them REALLY laugh for the right reasons and writing or telling stories is a great way to do that. And it's okay that not everyone likes your stories...not everyone likes vanilla ice cream, either. But if you and your family and friends like to laugh, keep writing for them and YOU! Look at all these strangers who already want you to keep going. Do it, man!

    ReplyDelete
  36. I never really had much problem with peer pressure when I was younger, luckily. And I think I was that lucky because when I realized that some people wouldn't like certain things, I sat down and really asked myself: "Why do I care?"

    And most of the people who might not approve. . . I really didn't care about. Oh, I cared what teachers and my parents thought, because they could really get me in trouble and seemed to have my best interests in mind. But people my own age? They wanted me to fall in line to make THEM feel better "And why should I let them treat me like a puppet for their amusement?" or they just generally didn't get/like what I did "So why would I want to spend more time with them if we don't like the same things?" So I was just myself. I might have had less friends then other people, but the friends I had were true friends, and they liked me for who I was, not because I acted or said what they wanted.

    And I was a withdrawn, bookish kid who had few social skills and a funny walk (I wore corrective shoes for a year). A kid like Gomer should have problem making plenty of friends, even if he annoys off the Queen Bees and Alpha Males. Just remind him to always ask himself why he should change - and if he's doing it because a few people he'll know a short time are jerks, it's not worth losing those friends who'll be with you a lifetime.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Your posts are usually so funny. This one breaks my heart! My daughter is only 1 and she is hilarious already, I can see it in her that it will be part of her and I pray she doesn't give that up to "fit in". Oh this makes me sad! Tell Gomer that my husband makes me laugh, even when I'm super pissed at him, which makes me more pissed that I laugh, but that that is one of the main reasons I married him. Because he is HILARIOUS, so if Gomer keeps being funny he can snag a smoking hot SAHM who is also on OAM--lol! Maybe he'll try hard not to be funny! Tell him funny men are the sexiest men, the most fun men, and the ones that attract the most attention from smart girls because you have to be smart to be funny! (Plus we all already know that Gomer is handsome, he's the total package!!).

    ReplyDelete
  38. Anonymous05:54

    Jen,

    I read your blog daily and see glimpses of you through your posts. Today I saw the woman and mother that I desire to be. If I am ever blessed to become a mother (2.5+ years of infertility treatments can make you doubt that possibility) I pray that I have the encourging nature you have with your own children. Thank you for letting the world glimpse at you and your life.

    Lori D

    ReplyDelete
  39. Anonymous07:12

    From reading your blog, I can assume that Gomer has your sense of humor and to deprive the world of that would be devastating. I look forward to reading his books one day.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Anonymous08:36

    As someone who had a parent do that to me and try to stifle my creativity - you are right on there. Oddly, I had more support from my peers than that parent? In spite of that, I pushed forward but probably was cut off at the knees so to say for some time. I now understand that the reason this parent did that was jealousy. Don't get me wrong, loved my parents but sometimes their own issues cloud their kids.

    Gomer, don't be afraid to be creative. Some of the most brilliant and creative people (Robin Williams) have people laugh at them and they have made millions doing it! Friends who do not appreciate you and anyone else for who you are and all your talents, goodness and sometimes faults are not worth your time. The "coolest" kids in school never succeed in real life.

    ReplyDelete
  41. My son used to write the craziest stories when he was that age, I remember this one called "a killer clown" that was hair raising...He also had the longest jokes that kept going and going and took forever to get through. Everytime he told them he changed them a bit. He also had a crazy memory for statistics that he memorized from baseball and hockey cards. It would not be unusual to get calls late at night (from drunken relatives, trying to settle a bet) about some sports statistic. "wake him up, i've got money riding on this". When he went off to college for my attempt at him being a Business Admin major (so much for that), his favorite class was english. Because he was allowed to use his imagination. And then a couple years ago I read a Stephan, Steven, (whatever, I'm sure you know who I mean)King autobiography and he wrote about either his grandmother or his mother I can't remember which one, that used to pay him a dime or a quarter or something like that....for every story, and that's what kept him going to keep writing. That amazed me, if only I had thought of that.... who knows where my son would have gone on to. So moral or story....pay your son actual money for each story. My son is still funny ...in fact he always seems to be the life of the party even now. He's 32 and his sense of humor still keeps me going. Does your son read alot....I was/am a library patron and consiquently my kids spent alot of time in a library as well and all of them are avid readers. That makes such a difference. Another thought....I have a neice about 9 I think...and she has a blog - maybe "gomer" needs a blog ...whatever it takes - keep him writing,that's the one thing that I always think I failed him cause his imagination wasn't encouraged in such a way that it kept him interested. A couple years later I wanted him to get his grades up cause he always had c's. So It was march I think and I said I would pay $50 bucks for every A. And he produced an A in EVERY subject by the end of june. And there were 10 of them in grade 6 I even had to pay 50 bucks for Phys Ed because the remarks said "vast improvement". So money$$$ talks.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Keep on writing, Gomer. There is only one you- So be the best You you can be! Sometimes, kids are mean, but let me tell you a secret: It really, honestly is because they're jealous. I didn't believe it when people told me that when I was little, but now, I know that its true. Don't stop writing and don't stop being the hilarious, witty, awesome guy that you are!

    ReplyDelete
  43. Anonymous18:50

    Gomer:

    I believe in realistic advice, so here's mine. School is tough. School is waaaay tougher than being a grown-up sometimes. Because those people who laugh at you make up your whole world, and you can't just leave when you feel like it.

    But those people who laugh at you... guess what? You laugh louder than them. Turn it around on them. Because if you can laugh at yourself, then they have no power over you.

    I let what other people thought of me rule over my days at school. And you know what? I missed out on a lot of fun because of it. Now that I'm a grown-up, I do a lot of silly, goofy stuff just because I can. Don't be like me. Do the silly, goofy stuff now! Don't wait!

    Be who you feel like being. Not who everyone else wants you to be.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Oh, I loved this one so. Gomer will be fine because you know that listening to your inner writer is more important than what anybody thinks. Perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  45. UGH! You made me cry Jen! You did a great job gently guiding him in the right direction (except for, like someone else said, correcting spelling and stuff, I may have saved that for another time, but that's really no biggie), and I seriously doubt my abilities to do the same! I don't know that I have the tools to know how to guide a kid through this society! It's so crazy out there, and peoples fucked-up-ness is starting earlier and earlier. I am scared, for real! Great job, and go Gomer! Let us read some of your stuff, bud! Devan

    ReplyDelete
  46. Anonymous17:58

    Ah, the awkward school age. The time may come to get him involved in music as well. KISS is getting in on the parenting game, http://bit.ly/PCkDQD Rock may be a good confidence building exercise.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Both of my kids have had to deal with being picked on and bullied at times. I really think school changes a kid and a lot of times not in a good way. If I had to do it all again I would probably homeschool and shield my kids from the cruelty as long as possible. But I didn't and they did have to deal with it. The best advice I think I ever gave my kids and I think fits for Gomer is "in 5,10...20 years you won't even know these people. You won't even remember 90% of their names. Don't let people who are such a small part of your life effect how you feel about yourself. Who cares what they think?" My oldest is now 16 and I told him this when he was 10 or 11 and going through a really rough time. Last year he told me I was right, he didn't remember most of the people from elementary school already. If you don't remember the person you most likely won't remember what they said so do your best and just let it roll off your back and continue to be who you are.

    ReplyDelete
  48. I just pinned this post on my "School" board of Pinterest. Can I use it as an example in my Parenting and Child Development class? This is a great example of how to explain a tough subject to a child and encourage them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Definitely! Thanks for asking!

      Delete